Working together for a resilient Birmingham.

National Flood Forum Bulletin November 2017

 

National Flood Forum’s latest Bulletin November 2017 has been published.

 

The National Flood Forum works in communities and with partners to support people at risk from flooding, and should flooding occur, to help them recover. Communities lie at the centre of this and throughout this bulletin there are examples of people working to take control of the flooding in their lives.

 

Visit www.nationalfloodforum.org.uk to find out more about the work of the National Flood Forum

If you would like to contribute to the next bulletin or have any feedback, please send it to bulletin@floodforum.org.uk

To read the latest copy Bulletin – November 2017

Road Safety Week 2017

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Road crashes are one of the biggest causes of death and serious injury among children and young people. Dangerous roads also have a major impact on their ability to walk, cycle and live healthy active lifestyles. That’s why it’s important to develop pupils’ awareness of the risks on roads, as well as reaching out to parents and the wider community. Plus, road safety is a great topic to engage pupils of all ages.

 

Road Safety Week is the UK’s biggest road safety event, coordinated annually by Brake, the road safety charity. Road Safety Week (20 – 26 November 2017) aims to inspire thousands of schools, organisations and communities to take action on road safety and promote life-saving messages during the Week and beyond. It also provides a focal point for professionals working in road safety to boost awareness and engagement in their work.

 

Thousands of schools, nurseries, colleges, community groups and organisations work together during the UK’s biggest road safety event, raising awareness about road safety and helping save lives. Road Safety Week is the ideal time to run road safety lessons and assemblies or launch a campaign for safer local streets.
Every year they choose a different theme for the Week: read about this year’s theme here.

How to get involved

They have developed some brand new online resources for 2017, free to all those who register using our online form. The free online action pack includes more advice, ideas and resources, including lesson plans, assembly presentations, activity sheets and fact sheets linked to the 2017 theme of Speed Down Save Lives.

To help inspire you and give more details about how to use the resources, they’ve recorded a short webcast below.

Interactive resources

To help you raise awareness about road safety, we have a variety of interactive resources for you to try.

These games and videos have been developed to support the 2017 theme of Speed Down Save Lives.

 

You may also find these resources on other road safety topics useful:

SOBER: Listen to five characters talk about drinking, drug use and driving

SOBER: Calculate how different drinks affect your blood-alcohol level, courtesy of the Morning After drink-drive campaign

SECURE: Take the seat belt challenge! (a game for Key Stage 1 kids)

SILENT: Find the distractions in our game for all ages, Driven to distraction!

SHARP: Raise awareness of how poor vision makes driving dangerous

SUSTAINABLE: Encouraging everyone to make our streets safer, more pleasant places by driving less, living more

For more information visit:

www.brake.org.uk

www.roadsafetyweek.org.uk

@BrakeCharity

#RoadSafetyWeek

www.think.direct.gov.uk

@Thinkgovuk

 

 

 

 

ACT for Youth: RUN HIDE TELL

Counter Terrorism Policing (CTP) have collaborated with specialists from the PSHE Association and Girlguiding to take terrorism safety advice into the UK’s classrooms and youth organisations for the first time.

Security experts from CTP have commissioned the creation of an animated core film designed to teach young people how to react if caught up in an a gun or knife terror attack. The film, aimed at 11 to 16 year olds, will also show them what to do if they see suspicious behaviour or a suspicious item.

Versions of the new film for Key Stage 3 and 4 pupils, (ages 11-14 and 15-16), will be the cornerstone of teaching material, specially-designed by the PSHE Association and available to Schools and Youth organisations from 13 November 2017.

Once young people understand the RUN HIDE TELL advice they can progress to TREAT, which has been created in conjunction with St John Ambulance. This age-appropriate First Aid guidance has been specifically designed to allow a teacher or youth leader to show young people how to deliver trauma first aid to an injured person or themselves whilst HIDING and waiting to be rescued by the police.

All materials needed to deliver these sessions can be found here.

ACT Run

 

Driving test changes: 4 December 2017

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The driving test will change from Monday 4 December 2017 to include following directions from a sat nav and testing different manoeuvres.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has confirmed that the driving test in England, Scotland and Wales will change from Monday 4 December 2017.

The changes are designed to make sure new drivers have the skills they’ll need to help them through a lifetime of safe driving.

The changes will only apply to car driving tests to begin with.

The 4 driving test changes

1. Independent driving part of the test will increase to 20 minutes

The independent driving part of the test currently lasts around 10 minutes. During this part of the test, you have to drive without turn-by-turn directions from the driving examiner.

This part of the test will be made longer, so it’ll last around 20 minutes – roughly half of the test.

2. Following directions from a sat nav

During the independent driving part of the test, most candidates will be asked to follow directions from a sat nav.

The examiner will provide the sat nav (a TomTom Start 52) and set it up. You won’t need to set the route – the examiner will do this for you. So, it doesn’t matter what make or model of sat nav you practise with.

You can’t follow directions from your own sat nav during the test – you have to use the one supplied by the examiner.

You’ll be able to ask the examiner for confirmation of where you’re going if you’re not sure. It won’t matter if you go the wrong way unless you make a fault while doing it.

One in 5 driving tests won’t use a sat nav. You’ll need to follow traffic signs instead.

3. Reversing manoeuvres will be changed

The ‘reverse around a corner’ and ‘turn-in-the-road’ manoeuvres will no longer be tested, but you should still be taught them by your instructor.

You’ll be asked to do one of 3 possible reversing manoeuvres:

  • parallel park at the side of the road
  • park in a bay – either driving in and reversing out, or reversing in and driving out (the examiner will tell you which you have to do)
  • pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for 2 car lengths and rejoin the traffic

4. Answering a vehicle safety question while you’re driving

The examiner will ask you 2 vehicle safety questions during your driving test – these are known as the ‘show me, tell me’ questions.

You’ll be asked the:

  • ‘tell me’ question (where you explain how you’d carry out a safety task) at the start of your test, before you start driving
  • ‘show me’ question (where you show how you’d carry out a safety task) while you’re driving – for example, showing how to wash the windscreen using the car controls and wipers

How the new test will work

This video shows how the test will work from 4 December 2017.

The timeline slider below uses WAI ARIA. Please use the documentation for your screen reader to find out more.

00:00:00

Who it affects

All car driving tests taken from 4 December 2017 will follow the new format. This includes if:

  • you fail a test before then, and retake your test from 4 December 2017
  • your test is cancelled or moved for any reason, and your new test date is from 4 December 2017

Your driving instructor should have been teaching you everything you need to know to drive safely, so you shouldn’t need to worry about learning anything new.

Read more about what will happen during the driving test from 4 December 2017.

Pass mark, length of test and cost not changing

The pass mark is staying the same. So, you’ll pass your test if you make no more than 15 driving faults and no serious or dangerous faults.

The examiner will still mark the test in the same way, and the same things will still count as faults.

The overall time of the driving test won’t change. It will still take around 40 minutes.

The driving test cost will also stay the same.

Why the changes are being made

Road collisions are the biggest killer of young people. They account for over a quarter of all deaths of those aged between 15 and 19.

DVSA wants to make sure that training and the driving test reduce the number of young people being killed in collisions.

These changes are being made because:

  • most fatal collisions happen on high-speed roads (not including motorways) – changing the format of the test will allow more of these types of roads to be included in driving test routes
  • 52% of car drivers now have a sat nav – DVSA wants new drivers to be trained to use them safely
  • research has shown that new drivers find independent driving training valuable – they can relate it to driving once they’ve passed their test

Changes are supported by the public

The changes follow a:

  • public consultation that over 3,900 people took part in
  • trial of the changes involving over 4,300 learner drivers and over 860 driving instructors

The proposals were widely supported by the public. The results of the consultation show that:

  • 88.2% agreed with increasing the length of the independent driving part of the test
  • 70.8% agreed with asking candidates to follow directions from a sat nav
  • 78.6% agreed with the plans to change how the reversing manoeuvres are tested
  • 78.4% agreed with asking the ‘show me’ question while the candidate is driving

Helping you through a lifetime of safe driving

Transport Minister, Andrew Jones, said:

Our roads are among the safest in the world. However, road collisions are the biggest killer of young people.

These changes will help us to reduce the number of people killed or seriously injured on our roads and equip new drivers with the skill they need to use our roads safely.

DVSA Chief Executive, Gareth Llewellyn, said:

DVSA’s priority is to help you through a lifetime of safe driving.

Making sure the driving test better assesses a driver’s ability to drive safely and independently is part of our strategy to help you stay safe on Britain’s roads.

It’s vital that the driving test keeps up to date with new vehicle technology and the areas where new drivers face the greatest risk once they’ve passed their test.

More information

More information for driving instructors is being published on DVSA’s Despatch blog.

Be Winter Ready

Winter-is

  • The UK’s gas and electricity grid companies have joined forces to launch Be Winter Ready. This campaign raises awareness of how to prepare if you have a power cut or gas emergency this winter.
  • Since 1990, gas and electricity network companies have invested £80bn in the UK’s energy networks. Gas and electricity supply is now more reliable than ever before. However, severe winter weather can still damage or disrupt energy supplies.
  • The Be Winter Ready campaign is urging people to take the following steps to prepare for the winter months:
  • Know your free emergency numbers – in a power cut dial 105 or, for a gas emergency, dial 0800 111 999.
  • Prepare your home – keep a torch handy and get your appliances serviced by a Gas Safe registered engineer to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Vulnerable households can get extra support by signing up to the Priority Services Register. Contact your gas or electricity network to find out more. Visit www.energynetworks.org to find out who your network operator is.
  • Keep your eyes open – keep an eye on the weather forecast and, if you have a power cut or a gas emergency, check on your neighbours.

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